California Condor

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The bird swooped into range  as I walked across the Navajo Bridge.
 I set my camera on it and started shooting. I had no idea what it was. Just that it was huge and I was mesmerized.

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I began clicking, rapid firing, following the bird wherever it went–high above me, below the bridge to the Colorado River, around and around, close to the canyon walls. The bird soared, dipped, and circled.

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I heard my husband behind me.

“Go, Jo,” he yelled. “It’s a condor.”

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I ignored his cheerleading and focused on the bird. I’d never seen a condor and I wasn’t sure that the creature now in my sights fit that definition. I knew only that I was invigorated, that it was beautiful, and that I had to capture it.

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I don’t know how long the bird stayed with me. Seemed a long time. It vanished as suddenly as it appeared. It wasn’t until I after I researched the introduction of California condors into the Grand Canyon and checked my photos with a credible birder that I realized the rarity of this sighting.

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The California condor (Tag #LO) in these photos is a young female. Raised at The Peregrine Fund’s World Center for Birds of Prey she was released into the wild in 2012.

And three years later, we met. What a gift!

Autumn in the Southern Adirondacks

Forests aglow in orange, red, and yellow.

Rivers and lakes run deep blue.

And nature’s showcased brilliance thrills.

Prospect Mt.

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Hudson River in Lake George Forest Preserve

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Photos 1 & 2:      Views from the top of Prospect Mountain over looking Lake George in New York

Photos 3, 4, & 5   Views along New York’s Hudson River inside the Lake George Wild ForestHudson River Forest Preserve

[All photos by Joann Pensabene.

Camera: Nikon 7100.

Lens: VR18-105mmf/3.5-5.6G lens.]